Friday, May 2nd, 2014

…making only agreements we are willing, able and intend to keep.

Make only agreements that you believe in:  agreements that you want to make and keep, agreements that your whole body/mind
says “yes!” to. If you don’t have your whole self behind the agreement, whether it’s your child’s baseball game or attending the annual
shareholder’s meeting, why bother? Agreements that are unimportant to you, but that you make anyway, have a tendency to come back and haunt you later because some intuitive person will perceive that you are not really there, or because something will stop you from keeping them.

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Friday, May 2nd, 2014

…making only agreements we are willing able and intend to keep.

It is much easier to not make an agreement than it is to get out of one you no longer want to keep. An agreement is anything you have said you would do, or anything you have said you would not do.

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Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

….acknowledging everyone as right from their own perspective.

Remember that disagreement does not equal conflict. Sometimes disagreement can lead to conflict, but it can also lead to discussion and learning. Indeed, provided you’re willing to engage in discussion, it is likely that learning about an opinion or perspective different from your own will broaden your understanding of an issue.

 

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Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

…acknowledging everyone as right from their own perspective.

Embrace the difference. Somewhere in there, be sure to thank the other person for having the courage to express their opinion. Disagreement means that the person you are dealing with is bringing a different perspective into the mix and offering you a chance to broaden your horizons. It also means that they value you enough and trust you enough to voice a difference of opinion in your presence (you might also like to congratulate yourself for fostering such openness). The number one realization is that you can appreciate someone’s viewpoint without agreeing with it. For example:

  • “You know, while I still think we have different approaches, I understand yours a little better now. Thanks for discussing it with me.”
  • “I really appreciate that you took the time to clearly explain to me how you see this matter. I hadn’t looked at it from this perspective before and it has given me much food for thought. I’ll definitely take into consideration the points you raised when I review this now.”
  • “I respect your opinions highly. In the current matter, I am bound to follow the workplace rules but perhaps in the future we could work on something to lobby for a change of these rules, if that’d be of interest to you.”

READ MORE HERE:  http://www.wikihow.com/Accept-and-Embrace-Disagreement

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Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

…acknowledging everyone as right from their own perspective.

Exercise an open mind. Ask a lot of questions––try to understand why and how the person drew the conclusion that you disagree with. You might find that they’ve experienced things that you did not, and that those experiences can shed light on your own beliefs. Asking open questions and listening actively will be the best possible way to find out what they know and it can give both of you a breather from any current disagreement.

ACTION:  Realize that people from different backgrounds and cultures may have very different ideas as a result of their upbringing and experiences. Their experiences are just as valid as yours. Seek to explore the interconnections rather than play up the differences. By combining your different perspectives, it’s possible to find a more universal and sustainable solution than simply imposing an order that feels right only to yourself and your life’s experience.

READ MORE: http://www.wikihow.com/Accept-and-Embrace-Disagreement

 

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Friday, April 18th, 2014

…speaking calmly and respectfully without profanity or sarcasm.

Stopping sarcasm can be hard and you may take a lot of self-convincing. Try never to hurt a vulnerable person, especially one who has shown you nothing but respect.

READ MORE: http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Being-Sarcastic

ACTION: Think before you speak

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Friday, April 18th, 2014

…speaking calmly, and respectfully, without profranity or sarcasm.

Like any bad habit, swearing is easy to pick up and a lot more difficult to put a stop to. Sometimes you don’t even realize that you’re doing it. However, it is certainly possible to change your swearing habits by recognizing that you have a problem and putting a genuine effort into correcting it. This article will provide a few helpful tricks to clean up your language – no washing your mouth out with soap needed!

READ MORE: http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Swearing

ACTION: Identify your triggers and learn to avoid them

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Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

…responding in a timely fashion.

Kristy assists Karen in making up our set up forms and getting our contracts out for
future franchisees. I think she is someone who is highly looked upon in our
building. Kristy comes in early and stays late in order to get these forms
ready. She even works through her lunch hours when she knows that the forms
have to be sent off on time. Her dad was recently in the hospital having a
major surgery and where was Kristy, here at work. When I would ask her why she
was not at the hospital she would say “I was there last night, went home and
got maybe an hour to two hours of sleep. I know that we have to have these
contracts out so I need to make sure they get out. She responds timely even though she had to sacrifice some sleep.

ACTION: What sacrifice can you make today to respond more timely?

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Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

…responding in a timely fashion.

Everyone wins with time management

We all have busy lives – both at work and at home. But it’s important to realize you are not the only person in the world with demands on their time. When there are meetings to attend, emails to answer and jobs to get done, it is important to live up to our Values:

We live our Code of Values by responding in a timely fashion.

In the working world, timeliness demonstrates your respect for your peers and customers. Responding to others in a timely fashion will no doubt earn you reciprocating action and mutual respect. And in a business where every second counts, we will get more work accomplished when we use our time wisely.

This applies to our personal lives as well. Making the most of our minutes every day will reward us in the end. Completing the tasks at hand, rather than putting them off for another day, will allow you more spare time and leave you feeling stress-free.

On those days when your schedule is jam packed, there is little time left for waiting on others. Be it to arrive, to call you back, respond to an email, etc. When you already have quite a bit on your plate that needs tending to, frustration can build when the person you have been waiting on was using your time for their personal needs. If this “time waster” is you, then take into account how the individual on the delayed end feels. Put yourself in his or her shoes. If you are going to be late, the least you can do is let the person know.

This courteous gesture will allow the other party time to perform additional tasks before you are available.

Valuing another’s time by making good use of your own will strengthen relationships with anyone who is affected. Responding in a timely fashion shows that you are a team player and customer service oriented.

ACTION:  William Penn, scholar and founder of Pennsylvania, said “Time is what we want most, but what we use worst.” Think about that phrase and how you can apply it to your professional and personal lives.

Remember, responding in a timely fashion never goes out of style.

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Friday, April 4th, 2014

“Think and Grow Rich for Women”

I am so honored to be included in this upcoming book - Think and Grow Rich for Women – by the internationally best-selling author Sharon Lechter. Sharon is the founder and CEO of Pay Your Family First, and the author of Rich Dad, Poor Dad and 14 other Rich Dad books, Outwitting the DevilThree Feet From Gold and Save Wisely, Spend Happily.

Of course, it was no stretch for me to want to be part of another book that has “RICH” in the title. Having followed my own passion to share The Dwyer Group Code of Values for Respect, Integrity, Customer focus and Having fun in the process, Sharon does that as well with her passion to share financial fortitude, personal and professional success, and leadership lessons from some of the most outstanding women to walk this Earth. Women like Condoleeza Rice, Sandra Day O’Connor, Angela Merkel and others are mentioned in this book and will provide lasting examples to readers of the strength we, as women, can possess. This is about more than money. It’s about a celebration of women. It’s about the pursuit and the ability to enjoy love, family, success and significance.  Pre-order your copy today at: sharonlechter.com/women

rich pic

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