Thursday, May 8th, 2014

…communicating any potentially broken agreements at the first appropriate opportunity to all parties concerned.

enrich1

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Friday, May 2nd, 2014

…making only agreements we are willing able and intend to keep.

Share any significant facts that will impact your ability to keep the agreement.  Share your feelings, specifically:

  • Anxiety, fear, nervousness
  • Irritation, anger, aggravation, resentment
  • Discouragement, sadness, resignation
  • Excitement, happiness, exhilaration.

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Friday, May 2nd, 2014

…making only agreements we are willing, able and intend to keep.

You can’t control how you feel but you can control how you express your feelings. It’s also not helpful to agree to do something or be somewhere, if you know that you have something else planned or aren’t going to be able to do it.

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Friday, May 2nd, 2014

…making only agreements we are willing, able and intend to keep.

Make only agreements that you believe in:  agreements that you want to make and keep, agreements that your whole body/mind
says “yes!” to. If you don’t have your whole self behind the agreement, whether it’s your child’s baseball game or attending the annual
shareholder’s meeting, why bother? Agreements that are unimportant to you, but that you make anyway, have a tendency to come back and haunt you later because some intuitive person will perceive that you are not really there, or because something will stop you from keeping them.

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Friday, May 2nd, 2014

…making only agreements we are willing able and intend to keep.

It is much easier to not make an agreement than it is to get out of one you no longer want to keep. An agreement is anything you have said you would do, or anything you have said you would not do.

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Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

….acknowledging everyone as right from their own perspective.

Remember that disagreement does not equal conflict. Sometimes disagreement can lead to conflict, but it can also lead to discussion and learning. Indeed, provided you’re willing to engage in discussion, it is likely that learning about an opinion or perspective different from your own will broaden your understanding of an issue.

 

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Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

…acknowledging everyone as right from their own perspective.

Embrace the difference. Somewhere in there, be sure to thank the other person for having the courage to express their opinion. Disagreement means that the person you are dealing with is bringing a different perspective into the mix and offering you a chance to broaden your horizons. It also means that they value you enough and trust you enough to voice a difference of opinion in your presence (you might also like to congratulate yourself for fostering such openness). The number one realization is that you can appreciate someone’s viewpoint without agreeing with it. For example:

  • “You know, while I still think we have different approaches, I understand yours a little better now. Thanks for discussing it with me.”
  • “I really appreciate that you took the time to clearly explain to me how you see this matter. I hadn’t looked at it from this perspective before and it has given me much food for thought. I’ll definitely take into consideration the points you raised when I review this now.”
  • “I respect your opinions highly. In the current matter, I am bound to follow the workplace rules but perhaps in the future we could work on something to lobby for a change of these rules, if that’d be of interest to you.”

READ MORE HERE:  http://www.wikihow.com/Accept-and-Embrace-Disagreement

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Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

…acknowledging everyone as right from their own perspective.

Exercise an open mind. Ask a lot of questions––try to understand why and how the person drew the conclusion that you disagree with. You might find that they’ve experienced things that you did not, and that those experiences can shed light on your own beliefs. Asking open questions and listening actively will be the best possible way to find out what they know and it can give both of you a breather from any current disagreement.

ACTION:  Realize that people from different backgrounds and cultures may have very different ideas as a result of their upbringing and experiences. Their experiences are just as valid as yours. Seek to explore the interconnections rather than play up the differences. By combining your different perspectives, it’s possible to find a more universal and sustainable solution than simply imposing an order that feels right only to yourself and your life’s experience.

READ MORE: http://www.wikihow.com/Accept-and-Embrace-Disagreement

 

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Friday, April 18th, 2014

…speaking calmly and respectfully without profanity or sarcasm.

Stopping sarcasm can be hard and you may take a lot of self-convincing. Try never to hurt a vulnerable person, especially one who has shown you nothing but respect.

READ MORE: http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Being-Sarcastic

ACTION: Think before you speak

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Friday, April 18th, 2014

…speaking calmly, and respectfully, without profranity or sarcasm.

Like any bad habit, swearing is easy to pick up and a lot more difficult to put a stop to. Sometimes you don’t even realize that you’re doing it. However, it is certainly possible to change your swearing habits by recognizing that you have a problem and putting a genuine effort into correcting it. This article will provide a few helpful tricks to clean up your language – no washing your mouth out with soap needed!

READ MORE: http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Swearing

ACTION: Identify your triggers and learn to avoid them

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